News & Press Releases

Posted on: January 23, 2018

Police Department Warns of IRS Tax Scams

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Tax Day is approaching in America, but this time of year also brings with it criminals intent on preying on taxpayers. Many people have encountered individuals impersonating IRS officials – in person, over the telephone and via email. Seniors are often targeted, but anyone with a phone could receive the call. Don’t get scammed. The IRS initiates most contacts through regular mail delivered by the United States Postal Service.

Note that the IRS will not:

  • Call to demand immediate payment using a specific payment method such as a prepaid debit card, gift card or wire transfer. Generally, the IRS will first mail a bill to any taxpayer who owes taxes.
  • Threaten to bring in local police, immigration officers or other law enforcement to have you arrested for not paying. The IRS also cannot revoke your driver’s license, business licenses or immigration status. Threats like these are common tactics scam artists use to trick victims into buying into their schemes.
  • Demand that you pay taxes without the opportunity to question or appeal the amount they say you owe. You should also be advised of your rights as a taxpayer.

The IRS instructs taxpayers to make payments to the “United States Treasury.” The IRS provides specific guidelines on how you can make a tax payment at irs.gov/payments.

  • Never use money services like Western Union or MoneyGram to pay your taxes.
  • Never supply an individual on the phone with your social security number, driver’s license number, or personal information.
  • Never provide a caller with your banking information, credit card information, or other financial information. They will claim to need the information for verification purposes, but don’t fall for it.

If anyone comes to your door representing themselves as a government agent and does not show proper credentials, call 9-1-1 for police assistance. 

This information is being provided to help keep our community members from being victimized. If you have any specific questions about scams targeting senior citizens, please contact Police Officer Jill Uhlir, Senior Services Officer for the Wheaton Police Department, at 630-260-2161 or juhlir@wheaton.il.us.



Contact Information:

Deputy Police Chief Bill Murphy, 630-260-2076

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