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Gary White, Communications Manager
Communications
303 W. Wesley Street - Annex,  
Hours: M-F 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Phone: 630-260-2192

Wheaton Remembers

“Wheaton Remembers” is a recurring television series in which longtime Wheaton residents share their stories of growing up in Wheaton to educate residents and preserve Wheaton’s history for future generations.

Read the synopsis of each edition below, and click on the titles to watch the videos.

Want to Be on Wheaton Remembers?

If you or someone you know are a longtime Wheaton resident and are interested in being a guest on “Wheaton Remembers,” contact Richard Sagen at 630-260-2036 or rsagen@wheaton.il.us. The City is seeking both individuals and small groups to participate in the series.   

Knippen and friendsTenth Edition – Wheaton Remembers: Joseph Knippen & Friends

With a combined 298 years living in Wheaton, these four friends can tell you quite a few things about this city. What was it like when only 7,389 people lived here? What did people do for fun? What types of shops and restaurants lined downtown streets?

Hear from Joseph Knippen, Dick Duncan, Les Gaskins and Harold Westwood about how Wheaton has changed through the decades. Knippen served as Wheaton's Public Works Director for 40 years.

 

60s students football gameNinth Edition – Wheaton Remembers: Wheaton Community High School in the 1960s

Former principal Chuck Baker invites Ross Truemper, John Stacey and Don Longacre to reflect on everything from Civil Rights in Wheaton to Friday night football games, overcrowding in the school, and the opening of a second high school.

1950sEighth Edition – Wheaton Remembers: Wheaton Community High School in the 1950s

Chuck Baker invites Dave Young and Brian Ebbert, Wheaton Community High School class of 1957 and 1958. They discuss what Wheaton was like in the 1950s.

Wheaton Community High SchoolSeventh Edition - Wheaton Remembers: Wheaton Community High School in the '30s and '40s

Howard Duncan (Wheaton Community High School class of 1939), Harold Gaede (class of 1946) and Paul Schatz (class of 1948) recall their school memories and what Wheaton was like in the 1930s and 1940s with moderator Chuck Baker.

Sixth Edition - SchefflerWheaton Remembers: Diane Knippen Lynch & Jim Scheffler

Hear from longtime friends Diane Knippen Lynch and Jim Scheffler what it was like growing up in Wheaton. The pair met in elementary school and swap stories about old hangouts like the Wheaton Theatre, or how there was a Woolworth’s in downtown Wheaton.

Fifth Edition - densonWheaton Remembers: Growing Up in the 1940s and 1950s

Classmates Pam Burt Lowrie, Sue Daleiden Denson, Fred Bennett and David Hennicke remember Wheaton back when the jitterbug was a popular dance, families practiced blackout drills to hide from World War II enemies, and teenagers frequented drive-in restaurants. 

Fourth Edition - machtWheaton Remembers: Robert Macht

This edition of “Wheaton Remembers” features Robert Macht, who grew up on a Wheaton farm in the 1920s and 1930s. His captivating childhood recollections will give you a taste of what Wheaton was like when Model T’s graced the streets and cows roamed the fields of small-town Wheaton.

Third Edition - lowrieWheaton Remembers: Pam Lowrie

Lifelong resident Pam Lowrie shares recollections of what it was like to grow up in Wheaton in the late 1930s to 1950s. See the historic home in which she lived, learn about the company her family started and find out how events like World War II affected the Wheaton community.

sportsSecond Edition - Wheaton Remembers: Sports

Moderator Lew Morgan welcomes three Wheaton residents with ties to sports on this second edition of “Wheaton Remembers.” Morgan, Sam Sublett, Lee Pfund and Ed Ewoldt trade memories of local sports heroes, popular athletes and local athletes who gained national prominence.

wheaton_remembersFirst Edition - Wheaton Remembers

On this first episode of “Wheaton Remembers,” four longtime Wheaton residents share their memories of growing up in Wheaton. The result is an interesting look at Wheaton’s history told through the eyes of four people who have seen the city through many changes: Lew Morgan, Tom Kay, Herb Wehling and Lee Roberts.